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Iron Master’s Farmstead

The superior furnishing in the Iron Master´s farmstead bears witness to the social position of the master, between that of farmers and the gentry. All the rooms are equipped with fireplaces and in the room for special occasions the ceiling is decorated with flowers and birds.

The Iron Master’s Farmstead (Bergsmansgården) shows how a wealthy mine-owning iron manufacturer lived in the 18th century. The buildings are from the mining district in Västmanland. 

Throughout the year, the iron master and his employees were busy in the mine and the foun-dry and on the farm. Mining was principally a summer occupation and the ore was transported to the foundry during the winter. In spring and autumn the ore was melted and iron extracted. Spare moments were devoted to the farm. With their special trade the iron masters formed a social class of their own. They differed from the ordinary farmers both financially and socially.

All the buildings are built of logs and are roofed with birch bark and turf. The principal buildings and one of the two rows of outhouses are painted in the traditional red as was customary in farming communities at this time. Typical of an ironmaster’s house are the cast-iron chimneys. The farm consisted of three rows of buildings bordering a square yard. Really there ought to be a fourth row of buildings comprising a byre, smithy, sauna and ria. The dwelling house, called Laxbrostugan, was built in the middle of the 17th century to the same plan as a double-fronted cottage but has two extra rooms on one of the ends as well as a porch. Behind the porch there is a kitchen with copper pans and tableware of pewter and blue-patterned faience from the Netherlands. The end-rooms are furnished respectively as a bedchamber and a farm office.
The superior furnishing bears witness to the social position of the iron master, between that of farmers and the gentry. All the rooms are equipped with fireplaces and in the room for special occasions the ceiling is decorated with flowers and birds. The furniture includes large cupboards and sideboards as well as a type of pendulum clock constructed by the noted Swedish scientist Christoffer Polhem (1661–1751).
The room for special occasions contains various different sorts of chairs and there is a portrait of the monarch on the wall. The large table is covered by an embroidered red woollen cloth, a copy of a 17th century cloth.

The two ranges of two-storied storehouses are tool sheds with sleeping premises on the upper floor. Beyond the square of the farm is a little storehouse from Järnboås dated 1783.

The buildings on the farmstead - the cottage from Laxbro and the storehouses from Yrstatorp, Greksåsar and Vassland -  are all moved to Skansen from the western part of Västmanland in the Örebro county.  


1720-1820


Buildings & workshops A - Z

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