Smithy

As the temperature rises the colour of the melting iron turns to red and then to yellow. At 1300 degrees it is white. For the smith to be able to judge the colour of the iron, the smithy is rather dark with very small windows.

Opening hours

16/12 10:00 AM - 4:00 PM
17/12 10:00 AM - 4:00 PM
10/3 11:00 AM - 4:00 PM
11/3 11:00 AM - 4:00 PM
14/4 11:00 AM - 4:00 PM
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The Smithy (Smedjan) is a low building with an earth floor. It was built at the beginning of the 19th century and was originally the farm smithy at Bruskebo Farm in Uppland. The smithy produced mainly smaller items that were needed on the farm such as locks, iron fittings, hinges and door latches. 

The smithy was also important for repairing the farm’s various tools, carriages and carts.

The iron was heated at the forge so that it could be manipulated. In order to achieve the necessary temperature, air had to be pumped in under the coal using a large bellows. When the smith had heated the iron he worked it with a hammer on the anvil. The anvil is supported on a large tree-stump that has been dug into the ground. The hammer and the anvil were the smith’s most important tools.
The iron needed to be heated to different temperatures for different types of work. The smith could determine the temperature from the colour of the metal. At 600 degrees the iron is still a dark, reddish-brown. As the temperature rises the colour turns to red and then to yellow. At 1300 degrees it is white. For the smith to be able to judge the colour of the iron, the smithy is rather dark with very small windows.


In front of the smithy there is a roof on four posts. This is the shoeing booth which the smith used for shoeing oxen. The oxen could be held firm and lifted up so that it was easier for the smith to nail the shoes to the hoof.



1870-1913


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