Chapel

In 1860 it became possible to leave the Swedish Church and to join another Christian community approved by the government.

Opening hours

17/12 10:00 AM - 4:00 PM
5/5 11:00 AM - 5:00 PM
12/5 11:00 AM - 5:00 PM
19/5 11:00 AM - 5:00 PM
26/5 11:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Show all Opening hours ›

The Chapel (Missionshuset)  was used for the Sunday services which were usually led by a visiting lay preacher. There were hymns, Bible readings, a sermon and prayers. There were recurring annual festivals such as the harvest festival in October and the Sunday-school festivals in August and at Christmas. The Svenshult meeting was dissolved in 1948 due to a severe fall in numbers.

By law, all Swedes formerly belonged to the official protestant Swedish Church. The revival movements of the 19th century were partly a protest against the official
church and its priests. These regarded the people who joined the revival as “deluded souls” and there were fewwho dared to entertain the preachers in their homes. Prior to 1858 it was illegal for private individuals to take part in religious gatherings outside the Swedish Church. When the law was rescinded that year the revival movement received a powerful stimulus. In 1860 it became possible to leave the Swedish Church and to join another Christian community approved by the government. Freedom of religion was not introduced until 1951. In the year 2000 the Swedish Church was separated from the government.

The chapel comes from Östergötland. The traditional red-stained timber building was erected in 1898 and consists of a hall with a balcony and a small kitchen. The hall is furnished with benches, a platform and pulpit, organ and a stove for heating and appears as it did in 1914. Paraffin lamps hang from the ceiling. Services are held in the chapel on certain Sundays and festivals.


1870-1913

Up