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Brown Bear

The brown bear (Ursus arctos) is Sweden’s largest predator and is found in the northern parts of the country.

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Today 21/4 10:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Sun 22/4 10:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Mon 23/4 10:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Tue 24/4 10:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Wed 25/4 10:00 AM - 4:00 PM
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The brown bear (Ursus arctos) is Sweden’s largest predator and is found in the northern parts of the country. Bears are surprisingly agile, can run fast and are good swimmers. Their strong paws and long claws enable them to dig, climb, catch fish and strike down foes. In the wild an adult male can weigh up to 350 kg and a female up to 240 kg.

Bears are omnivorous; they can dig up anthills and bees’ nests, eat berries and hunt voles. During the summer their diet is principally ants. Bears also eat the buds, shoots and roots of various plants. They can also kill and eat other animals, both small and large, including elks. During the autumn they gorge on crowberries, blueberries, raspberries and cloudberries—building up their reserves of fat for the winter fast.

In the autumn bears go into hibernation. They can dig out a den in an old anthill or lie down under a large, thick fir tree. They make themselves a bed of moss and twigs. Tradition has it that bears leave their place of hibernation on the feast of Tiburtius on the 14th of April.

The cubs are born in the den during the winter. At birth they weigh a mere 300–400 grams, are naked and cannot open their eyes. But the mother’s rich milk ensures that they grow rapidly. Bear cubs stay with their mothers for about a year and a half before they strike out on their own.

Formerly bears were hunted intensively. Hunting mainly took place during winter, the den having been located in the autumn.


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